Powers of X #1: Recap and Review

Powers of X #1

Story By: Jonathan Hickman

Art By: R.B. Silva

Colors By: Marte Gracia

Publisher: Marvel Comics

This week was the debut of Power of X #1 (X is pronounced 10), the sister series of the House of X. The first thing you learn is the reason that it’s pronounced “Powers of Ten.” The first page of the series reveals that four time periods will be the focus. There are referred by exponents. X⁰ is Year Zero, the period when Professor X created the X-Men. Followed by, X¹ as Year 10, the present time in X-Men depicted in House of X. Then, X² is 100 years later. And finally, X³ is 1,000 years after that.

Hence, the Power of Ten. Make sense?

I think it can feel overwhelming at first but after re-reading it, I got it. Powers of X #1, primarily focuses on the period 100 years in the future. During this period, Mutants are engaged in a war against the alliance between humans and Sentinel robots. Hickman includes the explainers like in House of X, helping us ease into this new information. At some point between X⁰ and X², Mr. Sinister was permitted to create the “Sinister breeding pits of Mars.” Similar to the Sentinel HOUND program, this program would breed mutants that had powers with “aggressive, militaristic traits.”

Why anyone would trust Mr. Sinister is beyond me. Regardless, Sinister created a “Chimera” class of mutants. The first generation had a “singular DNA source,” the second one had “DNA composed of two separate X-genes,” the third produced mutants that had a “amalgamated DNA featuring up to five X-genes.” Sinister created a fourth generation that resulted in “systemic failure,” the “destruction of 40 percent of the mutant population,” the “fall of Krakoa,” and “mass suicide.” One fourth generation mutant that survived was Rasputin.


Review of House of X #1


She was given DNA and powers from, Quentin Quire (telepathy), Colossus (Metal skin), Unus (force-field shield), Kitty Pride (Intangibility) and Laura Kinney (Healing Factor). Of course, Mr. Sinister betrays mutant-kind, and defects to the Man-Machine side. They publicly executed him. The mutant population has been decimated to merely ten thousand that mostly live out their lives as refugees and soldiers in the Shi’ar Empire. Some of the older X-Men remain alive like, Wolverine, Magneto, Xorn and Black Tom Cassidy (he looks like Groot). Meanwhile it’s revealed that Nimrod and Omega Sentinel Karima Shapandar are running the Man-Machine Supremacy on Earth.

While I prefer House of X, Power of X is really interesting. There’s a lot to grasp here but like House of X the explainers help. I also prefer the art style of Pepe Larraz, R.B. Silva is pretty good as well. Power of X does spoil what happens to the mutant nation of Krakoa. I’m not bother by this, but it does make the revelations in House of X feel worthless or at least knowing it will all be destroyed undermines it significance. On a side note I am interested in the Empress of the Shi’ar Empire, Xandra. It was indicated that she was interested in taking over the Sol system. Also she’s the “daughter” of Charles Xavier and Lilandra.

Overall, Powers of X #1, manages to include old characters with some new ones, while introducing interesting events. Future timelines in comics an become problems, but Power of X may get them right.

Sources: Marvel fandom

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House of X #1: Recap and Review

I’ve said this many times before, but I often prefer Japanese Manga to American comic books. This has nothing to do with there countries of origin (I’m American), it’s more about the way comics and manga are made. To be specific, manga series are generally written and drawn by one or two people. Comic books are similar, however, sometimes a new writer or artist can take over a series an change it. There’s also the problem of continuity. Changes to character histories and backstories can be good or bad depending on the series. These changes can become a problem if they feel forced or simply don’t make sense. This inconsistency has largely put me off of reading comics. However, there are series that have a single artist and writer. I’ve decided that I should at least focus on so of those series. One such mini-series is Marvel’s, House of X/Power of X.

House of X is suppose to show how Professor X starts a new beginning for mutants, whereas, Powers of X will focus on “mutantkind’s secret past, present, and future.” Once, House of X/Power of X (pronounced “Powers of Ten”) is over, Marvel will release six new ongoing series. They are X-Men, Marauders, Excalibur, New Mutants, Fallen Angels and X-Force. House of X #1 by Jonathan Hickman and drawn by Pepe Larraz, was released yesterday. This series has been anticipated for a while, as a reboot for the X-Men, the first issue is a lot to take in.


House of X #1

Story By: Jonathan Hickman

Art By: Pepe Larraz

Colors By: Marte Gracia

Letters By: VC’s Clayton Cowles

Publisher: Marvel Comics

House of X #1 operates as new begin for the X-Men. Xavier frees various X-Men from what looks like a tree. Then when see various X-Men planting flowers around the world. Throughout the comic, Hickman has several explainers for the reader. The first one explains what Flowers of Krakoa are. The “primary economic resource” of Krakoa, these flowers can produce several different things for humans and mutants. From humans three drugs, one to extend “human lives for five years,” one that’s a “super drug,” and finally a drug that cure “diseases of the mind.” Xavier offers these drugs to the nations that recognize Krakoa as a nation.

To this end, Xavier has invited six ambassadors from Israel, China, France, Russia, the U.K., and America. They’re invited into the Krakoan habitat by Esme and Sophie and greeted by Magneto. He will be giving the Ambassador’s the tour. Meanwhile, a group called Orchis, is preparing to take on mutant kind. Hickman explains Orchis protocol. By recruiting assets from the A.I.M., S.H.I.E.L.D., S.W.O.R.D., ALPHA FLIGHT, HYDRA, A.R.M.O.R., and H.A.M.M.E.R., Orchis is preparing for “doomsday.” The problem is that despite earlier predictions, the mutant race is repopulating at a higher rate than anticipated.

During the tour, Magneto explains that “mutants are the evolutionary inheritors of this world,” the island of Krakoa is for mutants only. House of X clarifies what an omega level mutant is. In Marvel, “Omega level” was often used to simply suggest that a particular mutant was powerful but didn’t go into too much detail. Hickman describes an Omega level mutant as “a mutant whose dominant power is deemed to register or reach an undefinable upper limits.” Hickman notes that in mutants with multiple powers, usually only one is omega. It is the priority of the nation of Krakoa to protect it’s “greatest natural resource,” the Omega level mutants. Magneto finally proclaims to the ambassadors that they’re (mutants) are not negotiating, and they (humans) need to understand that they have “new gods now.”

I’m excited for these mini-series. It combines my to favorite things, a great intriguing story with amazing art. Pepe Larraz art style is beautiful and detailed, with perfect color by Marte Garcia. This may not work for everyone but the use of infographics, to explain the world was really helpful and well done. Many of my favorite X-Men are here and some villains as well. However, Xavier comes across a little creepy to me. He wasn’t feature much in this issue. Maybe it’s that helmet that make’s him seem to detached or the fact that he seems to have abandoned his dream of seeing human and mutant kind live together. Regardless, I’m skeptical of him and his goals. Overall, I can’t wait to read the rest of the series. If your not familiar with what happen recently I don’t think that’s an issue. House of X #1 introduces a lot in explaining the new world, but it’s accessible to everyone.

Next issue, Power of X #1, July 31, 2019.