Anime

Inuyashiki Last Hero Episode 3 Review

Hiro Shishigami is stunned that Inuyashiki wasn’t killed instead of engaging in a fight with him he flees. Inuyashiki is horrified at the massacre and that there’s “another him,” and what it means. He’s saddened by his inability to save the family. The following day Hiro is at his friend Ando’s house. Ando gets a paper cut and Hiro reveals that he has the ability to heal. Traveling home from work Inuyashiki encounters a group of criminals that skip the line at the cab stand. On person foolishly asks them to “wait their turn,” they forcibly walk him to a secluded spot to assault him. The man cries, pleading for his life but Inuyashiki interferes.

Inuyashiki “fights” in a manner appropriate to that of an old-man, he windmills and throws erratic punches. The scene is both an effective show of heroism and the series since of humor. The man thanks Inuyashiki, who uses his sensor to hear a little girl calling out to her father as their house burns down. Inuyashiki attempts to fly like Hiro did. He looks to Astro boy for inspiration. He manages to fall upward only to fall back to the ground. The second time he’s almost hit by air plane, but he does manage to get to the burning house in time. He successfully saves the father and the grandmother.

Hiro convinces Ando to return to school. After class a bully named Tetchan beings to pick on him. Hiro steps in to help nearly breaking Tetchan’s arm. Ando and Hiro head to a roof, where Hiro shows Ando that he can kill people without gunpowder, he explains that he can hack into government weapon systems, use the internet mentally and steal money from bank accounts. Inuyashiki is walking when a cat is killed by a car. He becomes distraught and discovers that he can heal with his new powers. His first instinct is to head to a nearby hospital and begins to heal patients. Meanwhile, Hiro returns home and decides that he will commit more murder. He kills a dog, the dog’s owner and he baby.

Another great episode from this series. The most noticeable aspect was the humor. The introduction of Hiro to this series added to the dreary tone. Hiro’s behavior toward Ando is dramatically different from his views on the rest of humanity. He appears to at least be mildly concerned with exposure despite his claim that no one could stop him anyway. Ando is unsurprisingly appalled by Hiro’s murderous behavior, but is surprisingly brave when he ends their friendship. Like most people probably did, I assumed that Hiro would kill him and was surprised that he didn’t. The last to moments of this episode exemplifies the differences between Hiro and Inuyashiki, as they commit murder and heal the sick respectively. Finally, I think people need to start locking their doors.

Anime

Inuyashiki Last Hero Episode 1 Review

The bad-ass old man is a common trope in anime. In general the old man has massive experience in combat which makes them superior in battle. They often use their acquired knowledge to help the future generation learn. However, the title character of Inuyashiki, Inuyashiki Ichiro is anything but. He’s 58 but looks 80, something that is mentioned in the first episode. He’s just moved into a new house with his nagging wife and unappreciative kids, they hate their new home and aren’t too embarrassed to tell him. They leave to go have dinner without him while he unpacks the moving boxes himself.

Inuyashiki heads to work where he seems to be the oldest person at work and is irritated by the young commuters on the train. He finds a dog and brings it home. His wife and kids seem annoyed that he did. He promises to keep it in his room and names it Hanako. The next day he receives news that he has cancer and will die within three months. Inuyashiki calls his family to inform them of the terrible news and none of them answer his calls.

While walking Hanako, he and a young man are hit by what appears to be a alien space ship. They “restore” the young man and Inuyashiki using their weapons systems. Inuyashiki awakes still in the park, he returns home and notices that he’s thirsty all the time, his back no longer hurts and he can see without his glasses. Unsurprisingly, his cancer “mysteriously” disappears, baffling the doctors. Inuyashiki begins to feel weird and triggers some sort of reaction and begins to give off steam. Hanako licks his palm resulting in his arm transforming into a gun like weapon, but it shoots his dinner from the day before on the wall.

Apparently, none of the teenagers in the series are good people, as a group of them torture an old homeless man. They shot him with firecrackers setting him on fire as he begs for his life. Inuyashiki arrives and begins to walk towards the teens, they surround him and beat him with bats. While on the ground apparently unconsciousness, a camera in the back of his head activates and scans the park, targeting the teens. He shoots white beams at them knocking them to the ground, saving the homeless man. The same camera downloads all the social media information and their identities posting them on t.v. for everyone to see. Inuyashiki is tearful as he realizes that despite his transformation into a robot he remains “a person.”

Most anime/manga don’t focus on older protagonists and that’s a little refreshing. The series is both nihilistic and hopeful, but at different times. Inuyashiki is miserable all the time, no one in his life seems to like him or want him to be around. As a result he was the only character that was sympathetic, however, the dog Hanako and the homeless man become sympathetic at the end of the episode.

All three characters share a sense of helplessness as they are abandoned and find themselves to be lonely. Inuyashiki saves all of them. Hiroya Oku clearly has some commentary regarding young people’s obsession with phones and social media and how both can make them dehumanize humanity. The opposite message seems to be represented by Inuyashiki, who is ostracized by the self involve society and he literally stops being human. However, he manages to remain a emotional being unlike the teens, despite no longer being a human. Oku’s message might be too ham handed for some, and his story might be too deary, but I’m invested.