Weekly Anime Round-Up

Weekly Anime Round-Up (June 14th – June 20th, 2021): Jon Spencer’s Showcase, A review of Children of the Sea, and the Top 5 Time Travel Anime

Ruka from Children of the Sea

Scott over at mechanical anime reviews promotes Jon Spencer’s Showcase for June 2021. If you never heard of the showcase, it’s an event according to Jack Scheibelein over at Animated Observations is “an event held once a month where creators of all kinds and sizes are invited to submit things they have worked on in the previous month. This can be blog posts, videos, podcasts, or whatever else you feel like submitting. While I do mainly cover anime and gaming here, these posts can be about basically whatever, so feel free to share what you care about the most.”

Scott decided to add a theme to the showcase this month, Celestial Being. An independent group from Gundam OO, the Celestial Being aims to “create peace across the world by fighting all the other parties with their gundams.” If you wish to join the tour head to Scott’s site and post in the comments. Make sure you do so by June 29th.


Children of the Sea

Back in September of 2020, I mentioned briefly a review of Children of the Sea in the New York Times. The author, Maya Phillips complimented the music of Joe Hisaishi, but found the use of CGI and drawing conflicted making the “C.G.I. look artificial,” and the “drawings look flat.” Children of the Sea was released in 2019. An adaptation of Daisuke Igarashi’s manga, the movie focuses on a high school student, Ruka, and a mysterious pair of brothers, Umi and Sora.

The animations are clearly the draw, but the plot seems messy. Takuto recommends “visually watching the film.” The complex themes and plot points are difficult to understand. Takuto suggests everyone give it try and gives the film a 7/10. Check out his full review below:



The Top 5 Time Travel Anime

I love a top 5 list and Irina over at the drunken anime blog makes some of the best. Irina is a fan of the “device,” “I get fascinated by when it’s [time travel] done well and appreciate the effort when it’s done badly.” I’ve never noticed this but time travel is common in anime, especially the isekai genre. Irina limits the list to anime “where time travel is isolated,” or anime that remains in the same “place.”

Furthermore, Irina keeps to anime “where the time travel element was actively used throughout the series and important to the plot. So anything with a character waking up in the past or future and then having adventures from that point on is out!” Her lists include two anime I have heard of, but none I’ve seen. Check out her list of top time travel anime.

Misc

A review of Children of the Sea, how anime depicts athletes, and the promise of Black Myth: Wukong

A review of a unique anime

I have been meaning to review the anime movie Children of the Sea, however, I just returned to school (digitally), and have a backlog of anime to review. Regardless, Maya Phillips has a brief review of the movie. The movie combines “traditional hand drawing and C.G.I. technology.” Children of the Sea is an odd story that has phenomenal animation. Maya compliments the score by Joe Hisaishi calling it “whimsical string-heavy,” and “dazzling.” However, she’s not fond of the conflict between the C.G.I. and drawing saying that “the drawings make the C.G.I. look artificial, and the C.G.I. flattens the drawings.” 

Check out the review.

How anime depicts athletes

Also in the times is an article discussing the limits anime chooses when animating athletes. Maya Phillips writes “Because animation is free from the physical limitations of reality, it would be simple for these anime shows to slough off trifles like gravity” . . . ” they depict athletes as living just a few toes beyond the realm of possibility.” She mentions series like Yuri on IceHaikyuu!!, and Kuroko’s Basketball. She talks about how these series “dramatizes athletes surpassing the body’s limits.” She end’s the piece with Yuri on Ice, focusing on fluid animation, “The skaters swivel and swerve, fan out their arms and legs in a large circular sweep, then tuck themselves into tidy spins.” 

Check out the article.

Concept art for Black Myth: WuKong
Concept art for Black Myth: WuKong

A promising indie game

Final a few days ago I was introduced to a stunning game called Black Myth: Wukong. A project from Chinese indie developer Game Science, the gameplay trailer is impressive. According to IGN the founder, Feng Ji, wanted to use the video as a recruitment tool. IGN goes through what is currently known about the title and its developer. Game Science was founded in 2014 and produces mobile and free-to-play games. The story is based on the classic Chinese myth, Journey to the West. It gets its name from Sun Wukong or the Monkey King. Unfortunately, the game doesn’t have a release date, so it’s unclear when we could see it. 

Check out the preview


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